Category Archives: Nutrition

What Your Doctor Should Know About Food

Your doctor has probably received some nutrition information as part of a basic education. But when actually seeing patients in a clinical setting, nutrition is usually not considered in treating sickness.

Dr. Michael Klaper is an experienced M.D. and has some concerns about what he was taught in medical school. He has found that the causes of most diseases are not unknown and should not bewilder doctors. He believes that cause of most illness is the very foods we eat. He makes some good points and proposes a vegan diet.

vegan food photo

Photo by BadSwan

Many people today are wondering about their diet, the foods they regularly consume. Consuming animal muscle or other organs three times a day has resulted in a fast food industry that is making us sick. To supply all this meat animals are grown in industrial feedlot settings, injected with growth hormones and antibiotics, all of which are passed on to the humans who consume them.

It really it time that the medical industry begin to educating consumers about healthy eating and the sad effects of what we often call the “Standard American Diet.”

Watch Dr. Klaper talk about how a vegan diet can improve your life and well-being. He also addresses the issues of potential nutrient deficiencies while eating vegan.

What I Wish Someone Had Told Me In Medical School About Nutrition

Many people are interested in getting the most nutrition from their foods. And, most people want to help not only themselves, but the environment and future generations. For this reason many people are turning to a vegetarian or vegan diet. Such a “green” lifestyle is becoming more popular.

This involves eating real foods. Dr. Klaper makes a good point that too many people are eating food-like substances that come in attractive, colorful boxes. These manufactured food-like substances are made to make your mouth water and make you feel good, not to ensure you are getting all the nutrients you require.

Real foods are potatoes not potato chips, corn not corn chips, apples not pop tarts,

There are many benefits of the vegan lifestyle where you eat real foods. Among them are:

  • Decrease in sugar levels. A diet of whole, real, foods has fiber that slows down the absorption of sugars into your bloodstream. This helps moderate your sugar levels and reduces the insulin spike that drives sugar levels down to the point that you feed tired and sluggish.
  • Easier weight loss. An increase in carbohydrates in vegetables as well as a decrease in animal fats helps moderate your weight. The fact that you need to chew more means more energy is used in eating. This makes some fruits and vegetables have an overall negative calorie effect.
  • Lower fat content. Dairy products and meat have considerable fat content. Reducing fat content by eliminating meat and dairy can make a substantial difference to your health.
  • Avoids animal hormones and antibiotics. At a time when we are becoming more concerned about resistance to antibiotics and weight gain, a vegan diet has definite benefits. Most animals are raised in feed lots where they are given weight grain hormones increase their growth rate as well as antibiotics to reduce the spread of certain diseases. If you’re going to eat meat, buy organic meat.

A vegan diet offers you many health advantages. If you have not investigated being vegan, now before you come down with a chronic illness, is a good time to consider it. Be healthy.

Discover the Health Benefits of Turmeric

What is Turmeric?

Turmeric is an inexpensive, tasty, yellow spice used extensively in Asian food. It is also used as a dye for saris and Buddhist monk’s robes. Turmeric is a perennial plant that is native to South and Southeast Asia. It requires warm temperatures (68-86 degrees Fahrenheit) and a rainy environment.

Turmeric photo

Photo by bungasirait

It has a long history of use spanning thousands of years in both India and China as a cure for many ailments. Turmeric has played a part in Ayurveda, Siddha medicine, Unani, and traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. More recently western researchers have investigated turmeric and have discovered evidence of many health benefits. One active ingredient in turmeric, curcumin, has shown its power for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. More than a billion people regularly consume curcumin in their diet.

Health Benefits of Turmeric

One key to health involves preventing free radical damage throughout your body. Free radicals are atoms or molecules with unpaired electrons that cause chemical reactions (oxidative damage) with cells in your body. They can damage lipids, proteins, DNA, or cell membranes. Free radical damage prevents the body from functioning normally and often causes inflammation or even cell death.

Unfortunately, there are many things in our environment that can create free radicals. Free radicals can be generated by the foods we eat, various drugs and medicines, air and water pollutants, pesticides and exercise to name a few. Oxidative damage caused by free radicals has been associated with various chronic diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases as well as aging.

To the rescue come antioxidants. These free radical scavengers either prevent free radicals from forming or react with existing free radicals to neutralize them and make them safe. By reducing damage, any inflammation to aid in repairing cell damage is less necessary.

Curcumin has a “potent anti-inflammatory property” that helps keep free radical contained. It’s antioxidant property is 5 to 10 times stronger than vitamins C and E.

But, you should not consider curcumin as a medicine to be taken when you become ill. It is best used daily to help contain free radicals and reduce inflammation. It is a key nutrient that you should take every day.

What Free Radical Damage Diseases Can Turmeric and Curcumin Help Prevent?

Oxidative stress has been a known factor in many diseases such as:

  • cancer
  • autoimmune disorders
  • aging
  • cataract
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • cardiovascular disease
  • neurodegenerative diseases

Subash C. Gupta, Sridevi Patchva, and Bharat B. Aggarwal in their article Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials in American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Journal citing half a century of research on curcumin indicated:

Some promising effects have been observed in patients with various pro-inflammatory diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, uveitis, ulcerative proctitis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel disease, tropical pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, gastric ulcer, idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor, oral lichen planus, gastric inflammation, vitiligo, psoriasis, acute coronary syndrome, atherosclerosis, diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic microangiopathy, lupus nephritis, renal conditions, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, β-thalassemia, biliary dyskinesia, Dejerine-Sottas disease, cholecystitis, and chronic bacterial prostatitis.

Clinical trials of turmeric and curcumin are ongoing. Some clinical trials are looking various types of cancers (breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung and colorectal), type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, dermatitis, cognitive impairments and depression.

Bio-Availability Problem

Clinical trials show that when consumed, the bioavailability of curcumin is relatively low. The liver rapidly clenses the bloodstream of curcumin, quickly making it ineffective.

Several studies has shown that both black pepper and fats greatly help the absorption and retention of curcumin. So, it’s best not to take curcumin on an empty stomach, but rather with a meal including some fats and black pepper.

How to get the most of Curcumin. Should you take pills or whole turmeric? How do you increase the bioavailabilty of curcumin? What other foods should you eat with turmeric? These questions and much more are answered in this video!
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Are You Getting Enough Fiber? Low Fiber Medical Conditions You May Have

Fiber is the indigestible part of plants that goes completely through our digestive system without being broken down and absorbed into our bodies. Fiber absorbs water and helps make bowel movements easy.

Most Americans consume about half the fiber they should. The guidelines indicate we should consume about 14 grams of fiber for ever 1000 Calories we consume. Most people who consume about 2000 Calories a day get only about 15 grams of fiber.

Getting enough fiber means chewing raw vegetables and fruits, plant food. Consuming enough fiber is rare, especially when you consume fruit juices and fast foods.

Are You Getting Enough Fiber?

What About Fruit and Vegetable Juices?

juicing photo

Photo by bertholf

We all want vitamins and minerals in our diets. One way we think is helpful is by getting them from fruits and vegetables. So, many people drink fruit and vegetable juices. You might think that this is an easy way to get our recommended 5 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables.

But, real juices (not sugary fruit “drinks”) consist mostly of the fluid contained in the fruit or vegetables. Most of the the pulp or fiber does not make it to the juice. Most people who buy juices or practice juicing at home to get the nutrients in fruits or vegetables but not the benefits of the fiber.

For example, it takes about 4 large carrots to make one cup of carrot juice. The four large carrots contain 8 grams of fiber. But only two grams of fiber makes it to the carrot juice. You lose 75% of the fiber when juicing carrots or buying carrot juice.

If you want and need more fiber, you should consider blending smoothies instead of consuming juices. Smoothies have the nutrients of fruits and vegetables plus all the fiber.

What About Fast Foods?

Most fast foods contain very little fiber. This helps you consume them faster without a lot of chewing on the bulky fiber. It gets you out of the restaurant quick and on your way!

Here are some examples

mcdonalds photo

Photo by JeepersMedia

McDonald’s

McDonald’s feeds more than 62 million people per day. About 62,500 Big Macs are sold every hour in the United States. So, do you get good fiber with a Big Mac meal?

Let’s see.

Big Mac: 530 Calories and 3 grams of fiber
Medium French Fries: 340 Calories and 4 grams of fiber
Coca-Cola Classic (Medium): 200 Calories and 0 grams of fiber

Total for meal: 1070 Calories and 7 grams of fiber. You should have gotten more than 14 grams of fiber for this many Calories.

 

taco bell photo

Photo by m01229

Taco Bell

About half the US population eats at Taco Bell every month.

Quesarito-Checken: 640 Calories with 4 grams of fiber
Pepsi (16 ounce): 200 Calories and 0 grams of fiber

Total for meal: 840 Calories and 4 grams of fiber. You should have gotten about 12 grams of fiber for 840 Calories. of food.

This way of eating quickly with less chewing, avoiding fiber, to get on with more important things in life is leading to many medical conditions.

4 Ways to Increase Fiber-Rich Foods in Your Diet

Have Any of These Low Fiber Diet Medical Conditions?

Here are the results of a low fiber diet. If you have these conditions, you may be in need of more fiber in your diet.

  • Constipation: Hard, dry stools with sometimes less than three bowel movements a week.
  • Weight gain: Fiber helps you feel full and help keeps your blood sugar levels from being too elevated and then crashing, causing hunger and overeating.
  • Blood sugar fluctuations: Fiber slows down digestion helping to control blood sugar levels.
  • High cholesterol: Soluble fiber binds to cholesterol helping to keep it from going into your system to give you elevated cholesterol levels.
  • Cardiovascular disease: Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol increase the risk of arterial and heart disease.
  • Cancer: Some cancers of the colon and rectum are associated with a low fiber diet.
  • Hemorrhoids: Veins near the anus are irritated and swell when pushing or straining to have a bowel movement.

The “modern” way of eating faster and chewing less is not healthy. It leads you to support the medical industry when you find yourself suffering from one of the low-fiber medical conditions.

Do You Need a Fiber Supplement?

If you are going to continue eating this low-fiber way, you need to take some fiber supplements to avoid these low-fiber medical conditions.

I, personally, use Jarrow Formulas Gentle Fibers. I mix with with almond milk or soy milk and have it in the morning and evening.  I recommend it.

Jarrow Formulas Gentle Fibers, Promotes Bowel Regularity, 16.50 Ounce

  • Promotes immune health along with good digestion and proper elimination
  • For cholesterol metabolism and cardiovascular health
  • Promotes the growth of the good bacteria (Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria)
  • Supports healthy cell replication
Methyl Folate ((6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid or (6S)-5-MTHF) is the most biologically active form of folic acid. Quatrefolic is the 4th generation development in folate delivery. With certain inherited errors in metabolism and under a variety of physiologic stresses, the transformation of folic acid into the active form of folate either does not properly take place or is inadequate. Unlike folic acid, 5-MTHF can cross the blood-brain barrier. HEALTH CLAIM: Healthful diets with adequate folic

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Stay healthy, get enough fiber.

Sense of Smell Deficits are Common

Several studies have shown an important relationship between malnutrition and a reduced sense of smell. Several cases indicate that a vitamin D3 deficiency can cause a reduced sense of smell. Deficiencies in vitamins B12 and E may also reduce your sense of smell.

smell photo

Photo by Paula Satijn

In addition, deficiencies in zinc can reduce your sense of smell. Dr. Robert Henkin, Director of the Taste and Smell Clinic in Washington, D.C. believes that 20-25% of taste and smell problems are related to zinc. It may not be a zinc deficiency, but because the body has difficulty processing zinc.

You may think that zinc deficiencies occur only in third-world countries where so many are malnourished. But, this is not the case. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that 35-45% of the elderly in the US are zinc deficient.

Other conditions beside malnutrition can cause a reduced sense of smell. For example certain medications, upper airway infections, head trauma, neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease, and smoking can reduce the sense of smell.

In the United States more than half the older people between the ages of 65-80 have a reduced sense of smell. Three-quarters of those 80 or older have a reduced sense of smell.

The reduced sense of smell can have an effect on appetite. A reduced sense of smell reduces your pleasure of eating, making food less appetizing. This could cause you to eat less and become further malnourished. It also influences your food choices and may reduce your consumption of wholesome foods.

A study has found that deficits in the sense of smell are important contributors to the frequently observed lack of appetite in patients with serious kidney disease.
Nutrition Research News — ScienceDaily

If you notice a reduced sense of smell, first look to your diet. Make sure you are getting all the nutrients your body requires. You make be malnourished and don’t know it.

Exercise and Supplementation for Long Life – Pre and Post Workout Supplements

Exercise and supplementation can lead to a long, healthy, life. All people who exercise need to take nutritional supplements to replenish nutrients lost through sweat.

exercise photo

Photo by Fit Approach

Vigorous exercise typically causes a person to sweat.

Most people know that sweat consists of water and salt. The fluid in sweat comes from blood vessels near the skin surface. Losing fluid in your blood makes the blood thicker, more difficult to move though the circulatory system.

This is why there is so much talk about hydration.

But, sweat contains more than just water and salt. Sweat contains all the nutrients in the blood. This is why sweat often feels sticky, not like simple salt water. When you sweat you lose a “soup” containing all the nutrients in the blood, including electrolytes, vitamins and minerals.

If your are not taking pre and post workout supplements that supply all the nutrients lost through sweat you are in danger of a major physical failure.

Importance of Supplementation for Long Life

You may know that minerals are co-factors in practically every bodily profess. This means that minerals are absolutely essential for every bodily process. Without adequate minerals you will suffer a degradation in one or more bodily process. This can lead to disease and even death.

A major cause of death among student athletes is sudden cardiac arrest. In Ohio, parents of student athletes must watch the following video and complete paperwork showing they are aware of the potential for sudden cardiac arrest for their child.

Sudden cardiac arrest can be caused by a structural defect in the heart, inability of the body to electrically control the heart, heart infections, or a blow to the heart.

Many nutrients are required for heart health. Among the most important are Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, magnesium, enzyme CoQ10, folic acid (vitamin B9), and potassium. In addition, potassium helps stabilize the pumping action of the heart, calcium helps regulate heart function, phosphorus is important in metabolism and muscle contractions, and an imbalance in potassium to sodium ratios can lead to heart irregularity.

Dr. Wallach has experience treating athletes and has some good advice for those participating in an exercise program, whether competitive or simply for health.

Dead Athletes Don’t Lie – Dr. Joel Wallach

http://www.wallachslog.com
Exercise without supplementation is suicide!
1 – Exercise without supplementation is suicide!
2 – Wallach treats you like a dog, but you get better! (6:56)
3 – The difference is in the minerals (14:26)
4 – Mike Glenn – Why do professional athletes die so young? (21:36)
5 – Mike Glen – Story of Theo Ratliff and Rebound Fx (26:22)
6 – Theo Ratliff – The Rebound Fx difference (47:22)

In short, if you are going to exercise, you should go on a supplementation program to help replenish nutrients lost through sweat. Exercise and supplementation can help ensure a long, healthy life.

Get the details about Rebound for healthy exercise and a long life.

 

Disclaimer:
These statements has not been reviewed or approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.