Tag Archives: cancerous tumors

Stop Cancer Before it Starts

There are many organizations dedicated to finding the causes of and cures for cancer. You probably know recognize many of these such as:

  • The American Cancer Society
  • Cancer Research Institute
  • The Lance Armstrong Foundation
  • Lungevity Foundation
  • Susan G. Koman for the Cure
  • Leukaemia Research Fund

Yet, none of these organizations will be of much benefit to you if you do not practice good cancer prevention strategies.

Stop Cancer Before it Starts

Your probably already know how to prevent most cancers. We don’t need more research to discover these simple cancer stopping techniques.

tobacco photo

Photo by simone.brunozzi

  • Don’t smoke or use tobacco.
  • Eat healthy foods. This means plenty of fruits and vegetables, avoid processed meats and, if you must drink alcohol, drink in moderation.
  • Avoid obesity. Maintain a healthy weight and get plenty of exercise.
  • Avoid overexposure to the sun. Skin cancer is a common form of cancer.
  • Avoid carcinogens. These include viruses, bacteria, and parasites as well as air, water and soil pollution.
  • Avoid a compromised immune system.

Some Cancer Prevention Research to Keep in Mind

Eat Your Veggies

One study published in the journal Epidemiology studied how fruits and vegetables affected rates of cancer of the colon, rectum, and breast. The authors indicated that carotenoids, flavonoids, phenols, isothiocynates, fiber, and vitamins C and E could have anti-carcinogenic effects.

They found that raw carrots were the only vegetable that lowered cancer risks by 20% or more for all three types of cancer. They also found that apples, pears, and kiwi were associated with at least a 5% risk reduction for all three cancer types.

Overall high intake of raw vegetables lowered risks by 20% for colon cancer, 18% for cancer of the rectum, and 15% for breast cancer.

Cooked vegetables also reduced risks by 28% for colon cancer, 20% for cancer of the rectum, and 4% for breast cancer.

Watch Out for Sugar

Cancer cells love glucose (blood sugar). They take in and metabolize glucose faster than normal cells.
sugar photo
This fact allows positron emission tomography (PET) scans to detect cancerous tumors without invasive operations. This is possible by giving the patient a glucose analogue of slightly radioactive FDG, The cancer cells suck this up and it accumulates in cancerous tumors and can easily be detected in a PET scan.

Another study published in the journal Cancer investigated various glucose transport mechanisms in human breast cancer.

Glucose transport across cell boundaries is performed with the help of various protein enzymes. They found that the so-called Glut-1, Glut-2 and Glut-4 protein enzymes were active in breast cancer, but Glut-3 and Glut-5 mechanisms were not as active. Glut-1 was the most actives means of taking glucose into breast cancer cells. Such studies can help identify ways to slow down or inhibit the sugar feeding of cancer cells.

Another study published in the British Journal of Cancer looked at breast cancer rates in various countries. The researchers found that the rate of breast cancer in older women (aged 65-69) were positively correlated with sugar and fat consumption.

Yet another study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition examined risks for pancreatic cancer and consumption of sugar sweetened foods. The study looked at 77,797 women and men.

This study found that those who consumed the most sugar were 1.95 times as likely to get pancreatic cancer as those consuming the least amount of sugar. Similarly for soft drinks, those who consumed most were 2.3 times as likely to get pancreatic cancer as those who consumed the fewest soft drinks.

The researchers thought that high levels of blood glucose created oxidative stress which resulted in free radical damage to the pancreatic cells. The idea is that the regions of the pancreas produce hormones have low concentrations of antioxidant enzymes. Thus, they are especially susceptible to glucose created free radicals.

Yet another study published in the British Medical Journal examined how the consumption of sugar and fat affected the risk of colorectal cancer.

They found that the overall calorie intake of those with large bowel cancer was 18% higher than their control group without cancer. Those with cancer consumed 21% more carbohydrates than those without cancer.

The cancer patients consumed 41% more sugars with little or no fiber and 19% less natural sugars with fiber. They found that the third of the study group consuming the most refined sugars (with high energy to fiber ratios) had an 8 times greater risk of contracting large bowel cancer than those in the lower third of refined sugar consumption.

If you’re not convinced already, another study published in the journal Cancer Causes and Control looked at the medical history of 98,030 women aged 55 to 69 years in Iowa. These women were mailed a questionnaire on known and suspected cancer risk-factors.

They found that BMI was related directly to cancer risk. Cancer risk for 60% of the women with the highest BMIs was from 40 to 70 percent higher than for those in the lowest 40% of BMIs. There was also double the risk of colon cancer in women consuming the most sucrose-containing foods.

You Can Stop Cancer Before it Starts

Research tells us not only the causes of cancer, but how to prevent many cancers types.

Cancer prevention strategies include consuming healthy fruits and vegetables and avoiding processed sugars that are depleted of fiber.

Unfortunately, this requires some effort on your part. You’ll need to about most of the manufactured foods that contain lots of added sugars. And, you’ll need to eat more raw fruits and vegetables.

If you like fruit or vegetable juices, switch to blended smoothies that retain the natural fiber.

Cancer prevention is a choice you must make. Make the right choices and stay healthy.

Everyday Chemicals Linked to Chronic Disease in Men

Chemicals found in everyday plastics materials are linked to cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure in men, according to researchers.
Nutrition Research News — ScienceDaily

These endocrine disruptors interfere with hormones which make the body function normally. Endocrine disruptors are found in many everyday products. Endocrine disruptors can produce harmful effects such as cancerous tumors, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, sexual development problems, obesity, diabetes, brain development problems and other birth defects.

In Europe, phthalates are often called “gender-bending hormones.” They can affect endogens and estrogens that determine whether a person is masculine or feminine, particularly in development. They seem to make males in the womb more feminine.

Many of these endocrine disruptors are added to plastics we think are normal parts of modern life. They are often found in consumer products and building materials. Bisphenols are used to make plastics harder while phthalates make plastics more flexible.

Extensive testing before deployment of these types of products has not been done to determine their health consequences. We are all “guinea pigs” for the manufacturers. We are participating in a health experiment without going through an ethical examination of whether the experiment should be done on humans.

The presence of these chemicals is now common, even though they harbor the potential for many medical problems.

Watch Justine Burt interviews Dr. Ann Blake about phthalates – which products contain them and what are the better alternatives.

We live in a modern world of profit-making chemicals. Even babies are being born with hundreds of chemicals in their tiny bodies. The choices you make today in the products you use will affect your grandchildren.

If you have more time to investigate this problem, please watch this documentary by Stéphane Horel on endocrine disrupting chemicals, with Linda Birnbaum, Philippe Grandjean, Jerrold Heindel, Andreas Kortenkamp, Niels Skakkebaek, Ana Soto, Shanna Swan.

The Great Invasion – Documentary on Endocrine Disruptors

Our ordinary everyday lives are steeped in chemical products. Invisible, they are encrusted in plastic, in detergents and toasters, concealed in our food, in toys, in shampoo. They have invaded everything, including our bodies.
Thanks to the consumer society, petrochemicals, with their magicical powers and unfamiliar barbaric names are happily strolling around our little insides. These phthalates, brominated flame retardants, parabens, bisphenol-a, all have the regrettable habit of invading our hormonal intimacy. They are endocrine disruptors. The pioneer scientists taking part in this documentary say that from breast cancer to obesity, this chemical invasion is closely tied up with the diseases of modern society.
These findings are more than dramatic, but the film takes a step back from the straight facts, alternating wry humour and poetry. The paper cut-out animation shows parallel sketches of the destinies of human beings and laboratory animals. 1950-60s TV commercials show radiant couples dancing between two-door fridges: a love story between modern man and the marvels of plastic and the profusion of electric appliances, pure allegories of the frenzy of progress.

With Linda Birnbaum, Philippe Grandjean, Jerrold Heindel, Andreas Kortenkamp, Niels Skakkebaek, Ana Soto, Shanna Swan.
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